Limited Edition Lighting: Melba Disc Shade

Drawing inspiration from jazz bebop legend Melba Liston, our latest limited edition pendant delivers an artful composition in brass.

Comprising brass rose, holder and mirror-polish Melba disc shade all drawn together by olive brown flex, Melba adopts a consistent palette ideal for contemporary schemes

A row of Melba disc shade pendants

High-shine metallics have rapidly become one of the runaway interior trends of 2018 and our disc shades are now more popular than ever. The Melba disc shade works to direct and reflect output, focusing light and creating a focal point.

The Melba disc shade as viewed from below

Our Limited Edition comprises a small number of special products. Created by our in-house innovators, this allows us to try out new finishes or shapes to create something new. But, when they’re gone, they’re gone – there are only 20 available to buy of this design.

So, Melba, as with all of our limited edition products, is a fleeting finite offering. Each pendant is sent complete with an individually numbered limited edition tag.

So Why Melba?

Melba Doretta Liston was, first and foremost, a composer and musician of stellar talent. She was also a person unreservedly faithful to herself and her own vision.

Melba Liston - Inspired the Melba disc shade

Drawn to the trombone from an early age, Melba Liston would go on to become one of the most accomplished and influential jazz bebop performers.

Turning pro aged 16, Melba received her first break working with the Lincoln Theatre pit band. This early work exposed her to movers and shakers on the scene. Soon, Melba embarked on tour with a string of big bands.

Travelling with big bands presented its fair share of challenges. Generally male dominated, these big bands were often unwelcoming during Melba’s early career. However, her undeniable skill with the trombone and complex artful arrangements served to gain her acceptance. Melba drew on her strength, both mental and physical, to endure a harsh touring lifestyle along with a prevalent culture of abuse.

Collaborating with pianist and composer Randy Weston, Melba created an extensive catalogue of records demonstrating a remarkable versatility.

Ultimately, ill health rendered Melba unable to play the trombone. A series of strokes in 1986 left her partially paralysed. In spite of this, Melba continued to compose and arrange until her death in 1999. Melba’s enduring legacy is that of a composer and arranger of unrivalled talent.